Stephan Venczel and James H.  Fetzer Discuss  Fukushima and the Future of Species 

Stephan Venczel at World Technology Senate

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Epidemic of sea mammal deaths explodes as Fukushima radiation contaminates one-third of the earth

(NaturalNews) Dead and dying sea mammals continue to wash ashore at unusual and alarming rates along the California coast. Scientists are stumped, suggesting that the
 cause may be food shortages caused by abnormally warm waters – but unsure of what has caused the ocean off the California coast to warm so rapidly.

Meanwhile, the radioactive plume released into the Pacific Ocean following the Fukushima nuclear disaster draws ever closer to North America’s western coast. At the same time, radioactive material is still pouring into the sea from the Fukushima site. Could the ongoing radioactive poisoning of the Pacific and the dying of its marine mammals be related?

Whales, dolphins now affected

On July 6, San Francisco news outlets reported the discovery of a large dead dolphin that had washed ashore at nearby Ocean Beach. While one death might not be particularly unusual, a dead sea lion pup and a dead adult elephant seal were also found washed up at the same beach, on the same day.

In the few months prior, numerous dead whales had washed up along the nearby coast.

At the same time, literally thousands of dead and dying sea lions have been beaching themselves from San Francisco to San Diego. In the first three months of the year, more than 1,800 sea lions – many of them starving and sickly juveniles – were found on beaches or in coastal back yards. More than a thousand of these sea lions beached themselves in March alone.

“You could equate it to a war zone,” said Keith Matassa of the Pacific Marine Mammal Center.

Three of five years since 2011 – the year of the Fukushima disaster – have seen abnormally high numbers of sea lion strandings.

Mainstream scientists are not pointing the finger at radiation, however. Instead, they suspect that marine mammals are dying due to a food shortage caused by abnormally warm ocean temperatures. And they may have a point: Temperatures between San Francisco and Monterey are an astonishing 5 degrees warmer than normal for the time of year.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/050844_Fukushima_radiation_marine_life.html#ixzz3jIMfNzGc