Airline Stewardess Caught Spraying Insecticide on Passengers

Hsaive In October, 2013 Ms. Petra Haluskova captured video of airline crew spraying passengers as they were seated inside the aircraft.  One crew member scolded Petra to stop the video camera. When Petra complained about the spraying the crew arranged for Petra to be escorted off the aircraft by several armed security personnel.

Video link: https://153news.net/watch_video.php?v=1WOM34X82RBG

This is on a China Eastern Airlines flight from Shanghai to Sydney. The hostesses sprayed this all through the cabins about 30 minutes before landing.  I was told to stop filming. We had no information, no announcement, no MSDS or anything telling us what and why.

Airline Stewardess Caught Spraying Insecticide on Passengers

FACTS:

1. Insecticide active ingredient:  D-Phenothrin OR Permethrin

  1. It happens during or just prior to descent on ALL inbound flights for Australia and New Zealand even if you don’t see it. More residual sprays are used before passengers board, leaving a film on all surfaces.

  2. It is not the decision of the Airline. It is decided by the government of the destination country. Read: “Schedule of aircraft disinsection procedures for flights into Australia and New Zealand”

No need to bash China Eastern Airlines. They just do it in a visible way. Other airlines spray through the ventilation systems. Don’t believe it?  Read the WHO/IPCS document.

  1. W.H.O. and the I.P.C.S. have documented the reasons, procedures, risks and health impact. Read:  INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMME ON CHEMICAL SAFETY – Environmental Health Criteria 243 – AIRCRAFT DISINSECTION INSECTICIDES

  2. All passengers agree to this when they accept the terms and conditions of the ticket with no ability to “opt-out”.

  3. The hostesses/flight attendants are at the greatest toxic risk. Spare a thought for them.

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMME ON CHEMICAL SAFETY
Environmental Health Criteria 243
AIRCRAFT DISINSECTION INSECTICIDES

(Page 5) “Reports completed by flight attendants or airline personnel have suggested the possibility of the onset of symptoms in passengers and crew members as a consequence of pyrethroid application.The reported symptoms varied from metallic taste, slight and nonspecific irritation of eyes, throat and upper respiratory tract and, in some cases, skin, to severe respiratory symptoms such as dyspnoea, cough and even asthma. In other cases headache and allergic reactions were reported.” (More)

D-Phenothrin General Fact Sheet

d-Phenothrin is an insecticide belonging to the pyrethroid family. Pyrethroids are the man-made versions of pyrethrins, natural insecticides from chrysanthemum flowers. d-Phenothrin is used in homes, commercial settings, gardens, pet products, and mosquito control programs. d-Phenothrin was first registered in the United States in 1976. It is a colorless to yellow-brown liquid with a faint odor.

Children may be more sensitive to pesticides compared to adults. It is currently unknown whether children have increased sensitivity specifically to d-phenothrin. When pregnant rats and rabbits were fed d-phenothrin, their offspring showed signs of sensitivity.

d-Phenothrin is practically non-toxic to birds, but very highly toxic to fish and other aquatic animalsd-Phenothrin is highly toxic to honey bees.(More)

PHENOTHRIN: Safety Summary for Veterinary Use 
Mechanism of action of Phenothrin

Synthetic pyrethroids, including phenothrin, have a similar mode of action as organochlorines. They act on the membrane of nerve cells blocking the closure of the ion gates of the sodium channel during re-polarization. This strongly disrupts the transmission of nervous impulses, causing spontaneous depolarization of the membranes or repetitive discharges. At low concentrations insects and other arthropods suffer from hyperactivity. At high concentrations they are paralyzed and die. Sensory and nervous cells are particularly sensitive. (More)

Source: http://www.newsparadigm.org/2018/09/09/stewardess-caught-spraying-insecticides-on-passengers-inside-aircraft/

 

6 thoughts on “Airline Stewardess Caught Spraying Insecticide on Passengers

  1. We need to desperately Boycott The entire industry , Just quit flying and let the airlines die economically on the vines- Let Boeing “eat the aircraft-“

    1. Pretty soon won’t be able to fly without a shot, false flag CDC quarantining jet, fear, OBEY, submit…. Passengers are already treated like criminals to fly with all the searches, take shoes off, etc…..

  2. I have been subject to spraying when flying into Australia via international flights. I understand why they do it but it’s not possible for all the insects or bugs to be killed with this spray. Birds from the Northern Hemisphere flying into Australia and New Zealand bring ticks and mites on them infecting local birds, bandicoots, etc.

  3. thank you for filming this and talking. Thank you for your bravery. It happened to me many years ago flying from Canada to Australia. No one told me in advance otherwise I would have not gone to Australia.. I wrapped my coat around my head and face and body. No one else had any reaction. You are right this is a bad scene of the world now. Keep being an activist and be a survivor.

    1. Why worry about chemtrails when they spray poison on you sitting in your seat?

  4. I am proud of you Petra Warrior Woman ! God bless your heart for speaking up, I would have too but I swore off planes with all the geoengineering going on and no protection for populations. Really a mess, and those who are employed by these corporations and say nothing are just as guilty as those manipulating at the top. Shame. One day there will be a line. Enough. We all stand . Sincerely from Canada… C.C.

Comments are closed.